Filing for Chapter 7 Bankruptcy?


At the law offices of Thompson & Shreve we focus on bankruptcy and debt repayment. We can help you file for the proper level of bankruptcy, whether filing for Chapter 7 bankruptcy or Chapter 13 bankruptcy is best to protect your assets and set up debt payment plans. Call 270-737-1125 in Elizabethtown or 270-352-1125 in Radcliff today and set up an appointment for a free bankruptcy evaluation.

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FREE Legal Evaluation


At Thompson and Shreve, we provide you with a FREE Legal Evaluation. Our no-charge, no-obligation is risk free.

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Need a criminal defense lawyer?


If you or a loved one has been charged, accused or arrested for a criminal offense and may be facing criminal charges, you need a good criminal defense lawyer in Elizabethtown, Radcliff, Ft. Knox, Fort Knox, Kentucky.



"Thank you for all your efforts. My son was very grateful that no points would be assessed against his license. Thank you for making this easier for all of us."
~ Glenda

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Criminal Law

Criminal Law

What's the difference between a felony and a misdemeanor?

Most states break their crimes into two major groups: felonies and misdemeanors. Whether a crime falls into one category or the other depends on the potential punishment. If a law provides for imprisonment for longer than a year, it is usually considered a felony. If the potential punishment is for a year or less, then the crime is considered a misdemeanor.

Certain crimes are "wobblers," which means that the prosecutor may charge the crime as either a misdemeanor (carrying less than a year's jail time as punishment) or a felony (carrying a year or more).

Behaviors punishable only by fine are usually not considered crimes at all, but infractions -- for example, traffic tickets.

What is the "presumption of innocence"?

All people accused of a crime are legally presumed to be innocent until they are convicted, either in a trial or as a result of pleading guilty. This presumption means not only that the prosecutor must convince the jury of the defendant's guilt, but also that the defendant need not say or do anything in his own defense. If the prosecutor can't convince the jury that the defendant is guilty, the defendant goes free.

The presumption of innocence, coupled with the fact that the prosecutor must prove the defendant's guilt beyond a reasonable doubt, makes it difficult for the government to put innocent people behind bars.

If I'm accused of a crime, am I guaranteed a trial by a jury?

The U.S. Constitution gives a person accused of a crime the right to be tried by a jury. However, this right does not extend to petty offenses -- defined as offenses that do not carry a sentence of more than six months.

This right to a trial by jury has commonly been interpreted to mean a 12-person jury that must arrive at a unanimous decision to convict or acquit. However, a jury can constitutionally consist of as few as six persons. In most states, a lack of unanimity is called a "hung jury" and the defendant will go free unless the prosecutor decides to retry the case.

How can I tell from reading a criminal statute whether I'm guilty of the crime it defines?

All criminal statutes define crimes in terms of required acts and a required state of mind, usually described as the actor's "intent." These requirements are known as the "elements" of the offense.

A prosecutor must convince a judge or jury that all of the elements of the crime are there: that the defendant did the acts and had the intent described in the statute. Break the crime down into its required elements to see if each applies in your situation.


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